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Discussion Starter #1
Hey yall I'm new here but I was just wondering if yall have ever had the same problem as me, so everytime I replace my wheel bearings I do have to drive old out and new in so not knuckles but about less than a month after putting in they go out, I'm using east lake's bearings and seals but I used to drive the castle nut on as tight as possible with a impact so I'm thinking that could be one reason, but also I was wondering what brand bearings are best and would bearings and seals from my local napa be good, and would my ball joints affect the bearings at all because I think the ball joints are almost shot.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I for got to tell yall everything about my bike its a 2011 honda rancher 420 IRS AT on 28in outlaw 1s and it has a 2in highlifter lift with about 1 and 1/2 inch spacer thing in the shocks to stiffen the shocks up, so its not stock at all.
 

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2020 520 rubicon foot shift
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Im amusing you ride in mud and water all the time based on your mods.
Pack the bearings completely full of thick grease before you install them.
Water gets in the bearings if they're not jammed full of grease and they go quickly.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Im amusing you ride in mud and water all the time based on your mods.
Pack the bearings completely full of thick grease before you install them.
Water gets in the bearings if they're not jammed full of grease and they go quickly.
I always pack them full of black grease before I install them
 

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I am a Yamaha guy myself so maybe I am mistaken but:
The wheel bearings are sealed bearings correct? Maybe you can take off the seal and replace but if its a bearing pack I would just get whole new unit.
I have tried aftermarket bearings and they are usually crap - usually last about 100 miles. Use only factory bearings. Get a torque wrench and proper tools. Just because it's tight doesn't mean its correct. They sell bearing driver kits which make pounding in the bearing easier and you don't wreck them. If your not hitting the outer race only, you will ruin the bearing while installing it. Put the bearing in the freezer for 4 hours prior to install and it will shrink a little to go in easier.
You need to usually remove the spindle to do a good job of getting the old out and new bearings in, it takes longer but you can make sure it goes in correct.

Again, maybe I am mistaken, but I think most wheel bearings are similar and should last if they are good quality and installed correctly.
 
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