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Discussion Starter #1
Always trying!

This is the original 1994 starter. I’ve replaced brushes a few times. But the big problem is the brushes run dirty and generate lots of dirt. The brushes then stick, giving erratic starting. Then finally the starter dies when the brushes no longer make contact. So that was my main problem. But inspecting the starter I found that the front large o’ring broke in 2 and it was allowing dirt into the front bearing area. I had to clean the area up. I think the front needle bearing is shot. Going to call HONDA tomorrow to see if parts are available.

Pictures show starter in gear housing. Just pull it back and out. Starter with white homemade insulator, no longer available from HONDA, another homemade one inside starter. Mark your starter so you can put it back together the right way. And my problem, dirt and dirty brushes stuck in position. The left one I extended and the dirty right one is stuck open. Both were stuck open. Thus no starter action. Cleaned up, lubricated and starter running. But not as smooth as I think the needle bearing is shot.

BTW, one quick starter test you can do is a continuity test between the positive lead post and the starter case. You should have continuity. Mine didn’t. So it had to be pulled.
 

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I don't think Honda is going to have a needle bearing for you. If you can find a bearing part number marked on the bearing, search the internet for a replacement. Try eBay. If you can't find a part number on the bearing, measure it up (OD, ID, Width) and search various needle bearing manufacturers to see if you can find one to match. In all likelihood, the needle bearing is made to metric dimensions.
 

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You can buy a cheap china knockoff kit on ebay and get that nose bearing and o-ring and other rubber & plastic parts. But that commutator is shot from running crappy china brushes against it. It needs to be put on a lathe and resurfaced, then polished with oiled sandpaper and reassembled using OEM quality brushes. Honda still sells both brush kits for that starter.

https://www.partzilla.com/catalog/honda/atv/1994/trx300fw-a-fourtrax-300-4x4/starter-motor
 

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Thanks for the replies.

Not sure why this thread does not appear on the FourTrax main page. Had to search to find it.

I haven’t found a part number but as suggested I may measure bearing and try to find a replacement.

The commutator is in bad shape. It was caused by the brushes. However, the brush sets I have used were HONDA parts purchased from local dealer. I, too, am surprised at how bad they have been.

Thanks.
 

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Honda brushes work great and provide long life on a commutator in reasonable condition. Yours is not useable though, and it was probably too late to reuse the 1st time it was taken apart. You can resurface it as long as it cleans up within a limit of .015" in total cuts on the lathe. If the damages are deeper than that the armature will need to be replaced.
 

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Actually, that comm does not look too bad, at least from what can be seen. Lathe turning is a radical step, and reduces the life of a starter by quite a lot. Turning is a last resort. If there are no deep grooves in the copper, I would not turn it. A quick buff with fine emery clothe will clean it up. DO NOT allow anyone without comm turning experience turn your comm. And, the slots in the comm MUST be cleaned out after turning/buffing. I do this with a ground down piece of hacksaw blade, carefully.

As a tech in a electric motor shop for 20 years, I cleaned up thousands of DC motor comms in my time. Actually lathe turning a comm was a final resort to get a usable comm.
 

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Caution!

Precautionary note: Do not take emery clothe or any other abrasive to a comm unless you have a lathe or other means of turning the armature with consistency. To do so can result in an out-of-round comm, and very short life for the brushes. This may be the cause of your problems, an out-of-round comm. It will bounce the brushes and cause arcs between brushes and the comm, and again, short brush life.

BTW, good job fabricating the insulator.
 

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one of the brushes, looks shorter, then the other one.. that is a problem.
there is a lot of black in the contact's area. armature, commutator,. its been a while.. have to look it up. i sanded a many of them, perhaps lightly buffed, and you have to be even or you get major brush problems.
the space's between the brush and copper contacts should be cleaned out.
as far as being black, i read the other night, is is not so important. the spaces in between, maybe another matter.
 
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