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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone out there use the ATV DC accessory port to charge their ATV?
My trickle charger (2amp Black and Decker) comes with a DC plug that I assume can simply be plugged into the DC accessory port to charge the battery. But there is no reference to this in the manual of either the ATV or the Charger.

Is this a bad idea? I understand the ignition must be in the on position for this to work. But I couldn't find much on DC plug charging in the forum.

Thoughts?

2005 Honda Rincon
 

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Welcome to the forums! the trickle charger won't work off the accessory port on the atv, one it will draw to many amps ant two the atv would have to be running and would probably melt the tip on the plug in.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well, I sort of tested it to see. It doesn't need to be running, just switched to on position with key. And the Charger seems to be working, you know how it switches itself from on (yellow) to standby (green). It looks like its working, but since there are no directions for use I afraid I'm going to fry something else, blow fuse, etc. Unhooked it and thought I would ask someone that knew better. Thanks for reply.

I'm a little dumbfounded that they provide the DC plug adapter (charge out side), but more dumbfounded by the lack of instructions.
 

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Well, I sort of tested it to see. It doesn't need to be running, just switched to on position with key. And the Charger seems to be working, you know how it switches itself from on (yellow) to standby (green). It looks like its working, but since there are no directions for use I afraid I'm going to fry something else, blow fuse, etc. Unhooked it and thought I would ask someone that knew better. Thanks for reply.

I'm a little dumbfounded that they provide the DC plug adapter (charge out side), but more dumbfounded by the lack of instructions.
Go online to Black & Decker and see if you can find some instructions for it there.
 

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Welcome to the forums. I would just get another accessory plug and hook the wires straight to the battery and mount the plug somewhere handy to get to, to plug the charger in to. I don't like the idea of leaving the key on that long.
 

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Well, I sort of tested it to see. It doesn't need to be running, just switched to on position with key. And the Charger seems to be working, you know how it switches itself from on (yellow) to standby (green). It looks like its working, but since there are no directions for use I afraid I'm going to fry something else, blow fuse, etc. Unhooked it and thought I would ask someone that knew better. Thanks for reply.

I'm a little dumbfounded that they provide the DC plug adapter (charge out side), but more dumbfounded by the lack of instructions.
ADDED: I read this wrong. This is not the question asked. See my reply below for clarification.

It will work, in that it will power the charger enough to supply a current output that would charge another battery. Just not the battery on the machine.

The reason is that there will be some power loss in the charger itself, so if you are supplying 10 watts of power out, you will be using 12 watts of power from the battery, as example, for a net loss of 2 watts. You will actually be discharging the battery.

It will charge another ATV or battery, just not the same one you are using to power the charger.

If you had the machine running to overcome that power loss, you'd be defeating the purpose of the internal charging system which is already charging the battery.

It's akin to this http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perpetual_motion
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Clarification

Maybe I didn't explain it well enough, I hear what you're saying but that's not what I was trying to do.

The trickle charger as a standard AC plug on one end (plug into a wall). The out connectors to the battery consists of 3 options:
1) Standard Clips
2) Pigtails to Terminals (washers)
3) A DC power port plug

I wouldn't want to, nor does the device support (since there is an AC plug fixed on 1 end) charging a battery from the ATV out to another battery.

It appears by design to allow the user to recharge the ATV battery by simply plugging into the DC accessory plug versus direct connection to the ATV battery itself. Visualize (AC from wall > to trickle charger > to DC Accessory Plug. This of course would make it fantastically easy to keep a charge on my ATV.

BUT - and I cannot find reference to this anywhere, not in the Honda manual, not in the Black&Decker Manual, but there wouldn't be any other purpose for supplying the DC Plug since it wouldn't have any other use.

Thanks for replies - I'm just trying to get to the bottom of this one for future reference / easy of use / etc.
 

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Sorry for the confusion. I didn't fully picture what you were asking.

The use would be to trickle charge a car battery via the cigarette lighter, which would in most cases be hot all the time using a very large fuse.

As for the ATV, the fact that the accessory plug is switched would prevent me from wanting to use it as you describe, but would be OK if you do what Helmut suggested and add another plug directly to the battery.

As Quadracer said above, I also wouldn't use the accessory plug because it's not designed to carry more than a few amps, but it is fused so it wouldn't cause any harm, it would just blow the fuse.
 

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Additionally, if you wanted to use the existing accessory plug, I would unplug the accessory socket from the key switch, and run a wire directly to the battery, fused at 10 amps. That way you could use your charger and would also have a constant hot accessory plug. Don't do it without the fuse though.
 

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A trickle charger shouldn't charge at more than 2 amps...a blown fuse would not be a problem. With the key on, you will be consuming power, not sure how much, because off the top of my head I can't remember what lights are on with the key on (I know the instrument cluster is, maybe the tail light?). Anyway, the power used will pretty much offset any charge introduced by a trickle charger. The only way to use this is to rewire your existing plug, install a new one (fused, battery direct), or use the clips.

If you want a really nifty way to do this, go to your local auto parts store and ask for a two-way connector. They will usually be found in the trailer section and look like this: Pico 0710PT 2-Way Trailer Electrical Connector 12" Male and Female

Cut the wires in half, so you have two pieces. Connect one half of the connector to the battery using ring terminals (and a fuse on the positive side) and route the plug to an easily accessible location (may require extra wire). Butt the other half of the plug to your trickle charger. Just remember...on each half of the plug, there will be an insulated and a non insulated terminal. On the bike, the insulated terminal should be wired to the positive terminal on the battery, and the non-insulated terminal should be wired to the negative...this will prevent short circuits.
 

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Without seeing what this guy is talking about. my Honda has a plug on the left side of of the handle bars. which is an accessery, that I use to plug my sprayer into. it has a DC output voltage of 12 volts.
I would have to see a schematic of that system and see it there is a rectifier the may inhibit the flow of current in the reverse direction preventeing the battery from charging.

other wise i see no reason that the battery could not be charged in unorthadox mannor.
all it takes to charge the DC battery is a larger voltage the the battery has.

Sort of like filling up a glass of milk from the gallon container
the battery keeps taking a charge as long as the charger has a higher voltage than the battery.
a good charger will regulate the current when the battery gets near full charge.

RR
 

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The battery would charge through the accessory plug, but you would have to leave the key on all the time and I wouldn't want to do that. Most of the newer models have digital displays and I wouldn't want power going to the display all the time and also to the regulator/rectifier or the ECU as this could cause problems, not to mention it would draw power from the battery decreasing the effectiveness of the trickle charger.
 

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I believe the accessory you are looking at is for DC out put, for use of a portable air pump
a small liquid pump for farm spraying.
ron r
 

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Yeah, the original poster was asking if he could plug his 2 amp charger into the DC accessory outlet and charge the battery. He could, but since it's a switched outlet, he would need to leave the key on while it was charging. I wouldn't feel comfortable leaving the key on for extended periods to charge the battery. If I were going to do that, I would wire up another accessory outlet straight to and near the battery and just plug it into that to charge. That way you could leave the key off.
 

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Yeah, the original poster was asking if he could plug his 2 amp charger into the DC accessory outlet and charge the battery. He could, but since it's a switched outlet, he would need to leave the key on while it was charging. I wouldn't feel comfortable leaving the key on for extended periods to charge the battery. If I were going to do that, I would wire up another accessory outlet straight to and near the battery and just plug it into that to charge. That way you could leave the key off.
I agree...wire something to the battery. It's not that difficult to remove the seat.
 
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