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I have a 2016 Foreman 500 and wanting to get new tires, Can I get pros and cons to the below ?

Directional/ non directional

All 4 the same size

Staying with stock size(25) as I'm not changing wheels, looking at Rip saws or Bighorns, thanks
 

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these days with GOOD tires like you listed, directional ties work both ways just fine
picking a tire comes down to more where you ride and in what, than if directional or not LOL
as for same size, pro's you can rotate,
con's you get less traction sink deeper into ruts and fronts being wider tend to throw more crap at you, all the more so once you add aftermarket wheels which also stick out farther than OEM wheels do, wider front tires add more effort to steering, add more wear and tear(ever so slightly here LOL) to front end parts too

narrower fronts, steer easier, allow rear tires some edge to ride on in deep ruts and mud/snow allowing for more forward push/traction
con's cannot rotate!
NOT that all wheels even allow for rotating any how, so , unless you get wheels that fit both front and back of atv, you cannot rotate wider one's too!

pro's or con's are looks, some like one better than the other view wise?
persona; choice here!
 

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What do you ride on? There is a lot of difference tire choices. I don't really see any benefit to running non-directional tires other than the ability to rotate them easily. Typically non-directional tires don't work as well in mud compared to non-directional tires. I know my bighorns are about useless in any kind of mud, 2" of slippery clay and you'll be looking for a winch lol
 

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Your issue with putting same size, non-directional tires on your Foreman is that your front and rear rims have different offsets. So you'd have 2 options if you'd want to do tire rotations:
a) dismount and remount your tires from the rims when it is time to do a rotation
b) get 4 rims for IRS bikes, and then add 2.5" or 3" of wheel spacer to each end of your rear axle. Then you could regular rotations like you do on a car and like I do on my Grizzly 450 with IRS and 4 identical wheels.

That and traction & steering characteristics are why most guys stick with wider tires on the rear. I've had great results with my Grizzly set up as described though.
 

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what about kenda bear klaws?
I run Kenda Bear Claw EVO's ....... 26-9-12 fronts, and 26-11-12 rears.
Actual mounted/aired size is 26-8.5-12 fronts, and 26-10.5-12 rears.
These are mounted on OEM rims with no spacers. Wheels are inboard of the fenders .... which keeps you clean.
There was a chart of tire weights .....
Had the old Bear Claws which were undersize of the stated height. The EVO's are the stated height of 26"
Overall, a good tire for my type of riding.
 

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I have put thousands of miles on both those tires you mention.

ripsaws:
pro's-last forever, smooth ride, good sidewall protection from the lugs.
con's-these have a bad tendency to slide around corners, "pushing" is what I think the correct term is. I found they tend to really wander on hard pack dirt trails. They have a quick tendency to ball up with snow, when they are clean they dig, dig, and dig.

bighorns:
pro's-long lasting, smooth ride, well mannered on hard pack.
con's-ball up pretty badly with a low HP machine in deep snow or mud (gotta have wheel spin) they too push around corners, lastly, sidewalls are extremely prone to punctures! especially on heavy machines (we've logged 4k miles with them on rzr's) I have also found that they puncture quite easily, (one tire has 9 plugs!)

If I were in your shoes I would stick with a directional tire. if you do any sort of high speed riding on hard pack I have found that the directional tires corner much better.

Check out the bearclaw radials, they are my next tire.
 
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