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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Guys-

I wanted to make a new thread so my question didn't get lost in another post, so here it goes...

As you know, you guys have helped me solve the carb issues I was having with the float needle. I ended up just buying a completely new carburetor and replacing the original with a Honda OEM carburetor, as the OEM replacement came with the complete assembly- hoses, choke and everything.

If you aren't familiar with what I was dealing with, you can read about it here:

http://www.hondaatvforums.net/forum...most-there-carb-sputtering-gas-need-help.html

Now, I have a basically re-done carburetor for spare parts now that I'd like to keep and like to preserve in case anything happens in the future, but I'm not sure how I should preserve the parts- like the rubber O-rings and gaskets... I am going to order an OEM replacement float needle so I'll have a complete, rebuilt, OEM carb on the shelf in case I ever need it.

I was thinking about getting some grease and just filling it or covering it in grease and then putting it in a plastic bag and putting it on the shelf. I could take it apart and cover all the individual parts in grease and put them in plastic bags so they will preserve and keep them on the shelf. I just don't know how to do that.

I don't know what the shelf life is for stuff like that, and knowing how long the other carburetor lasted without having to rebuild or replace it, I just wasn't sure what I should do because it's probably going to be a long while before I need it again. I just didn't want to let it sit and dry rot if I could do something about it.

I'm open to any suggestion or any type of advice you could give me.

Thank You,

-Ryan
 

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No treatments necessary for a carb... just make sure the carb is clean and dry inside and out and store it in a low humidity area, wrapped inside a small brown paper sack, inside a small (labeled) cardboard box. Just loosen all of the screws a bit and wrap it up. It'll be good to go up to 20 years, or possibly longer if humidity isn't an issue.

A dry storage environment is key... lube the metals where necessary, temps don't matter as much. After many years, all soft rubber parts will degrade and require replacement. Nothing you can do about that unless you purge oxygen and store them sealed in an inert gas container.
 

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Retro covered it all really. The only way to preserve rubber parts is darkness and powdered chalk such as baby/talcum powder. Since you want the carb debris free chalk is out of the question.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the suggestions guys, I really appreciate it. I'll definitely get the parts out/apart and will do what you said. Hopefully I won't need it for a while, because I just replaced the whole thing and put a brand new one in it!
 
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