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Discussion Starter #1
last Saturday i tore down my rancher adjusted the valves to .006 @TDC cranked it up and it was nice and quite again so i put all my plastic on and took it for a test drive and immediately noticed that when you give it the gas it sounds like the valves are chatering very badly but no noise at idle. today i got a chance to tear it back down and i checked and then tightend them alittle (not that they needed it) and it made no difference there is no play in the valve's until TDC then there is .006 play, i didn't have this problem before i adjusted them and i have adjusted valves before so i am confident that i adjusted them properly. any ideas?
Thanks in advance.
 

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Welcome to the forums, you found the right place! :)

When you say you tore it down, do you mean complete engine disassembly or you just took off enough to do the valve adjustment?
 

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if i remember right there should only be play in the vavles when coming up on tdc comp and power stroke, thats when they are not opening its on compression stroke.
 

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agreed^^^^^^..only adust the valves on the compression stroke..and ONLY WHEN THE BIKE/MOTOR IS COLD !...if you still hear ticking/tapping when the bike is idleing/running down the road..then i would say your timming chain is streched.
 

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agreed^^^^^^..only adust the valves on the compression stroke..and ONLY WHEN THE BIKE/MOTOR IS COLD !...if you still hear ticking/tapping when the bike is idleing/running down the road..then i would say your timming chain is streched.
Just to clarify what shadetree said. If you adjust the valves after you ran it around and the engine has not had a chance to cool completely, then you are wasting your time. Pay attention to what they are saying about the compression stroke too!

Like I said, you found the right place. These guys will hook you up! :)
 

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timing chain

i just tore down our foreman to put a timing chain in and noticed the tensioner was not working.guess ill buy one those too,you might check yours .
 

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Just to add to all the other good advice, when your turning the engine over counterclockwise to line up your marks on the compression stroke, you normally have your spark plug out, and grounded, and put your finger over the threads, and you'll know for sure when your coming up on the right stroke, you'll feel the air pushing on your finger, (and how many of us here have had it almost right to your mark and blow right past it,lol? If you stopped on your mark and their was no play whatsoever in your arms, they you didn't adjust them on the compression stroke, and thats why they are clattering so badly. If all was done right,(on a completely cold engine I might add) I agree with shadetree, and your timing chain adjuster is at its limit, or stuck. If these tensioners are set up like my Suzuki engines (I don't own one) you can pull out the adjuster, and see if theirs any clicks left on the tensioner. You fully extend the foot on the tensioner, and place it back into opening, and if it bottoms out fully your chain is shot.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
alright just to clarify the compression stroke is when the piston is all the way up as far as it goes right? and i kinda dought that its the timing chain because i replaced the timing chain and tensioner about three months ago i could be wrong? i have tried adjusting it on the on both stroke's to no avail i really can't figure this one out. i also took the valve cover off and cranked it just long enough to give it a rev and they really didn't sound that loud but i don't know what else it could since it happened when i adjusted them it almost sounds like piston slap
 

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theoretically, you dont want to run it without valve cover on too long. to find TDC compression with valve cover off, if you have a recoil pull it and watch valves youll see them moving, when the one closest to the exhaust goes down thats exhaust stroke then you intake (closest to carb) will move and exhaust will start to close, then once they both close and pull till it gets tough your coming up on tdc when it reaches max tension and then moves around alittle and stops that is tdc comp. always check and adjust valves cold, tdc comp the reason why is this spot is there is no pressure from cam or push rods on valves and they are loose. another way to tell which valve is which, the exhaust is bigger.
 

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Take out your plug, and ground it. Put your finger over the hole, and turn the engine counterclockwise with either a socket,(if theirs an access plug for that, I'll add a pic from my bike to give you an idea, yeah I know my bike is so much easier to work on.LOL) or as said with your recoil. When you feel air rushing past your finger on the plug hole your coming up on the compression stroke, and that's where you want to align your marks before you adjust your valves. When its almost at TDC on the compression stroke slow way down on moving it, because it will fly right past it, and then you will have to make two rotations to get back there again. Good luck
 

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watch the valve

when the intake -carb side valve opens then closes,the next time the timing mark comes around is the comp. stroke,always.and make sure its the 't' and not the'f' mark
 

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Just to clarify what shadetree said. If you adjust the valves after you ran it around and the engine has not had a chance to cool completely, then you are wasting your time. Pay attention to what they are saying about the compression stroke too!

Like I said, you found the right place. These guys will hook you up! :)
If you do that wrong will it take away compression
 
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