Honda ATV Forum banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, new member and 1st post here :)

I've got a 2001 350 Fourtrax, and by reading posts here sounds like it's got a sticky float. It runs ok, but has a habit of pouring fuel out the over flow.

How do you clean the carb out, will running carb cleaner through it make any diff, or has it got to be taken apart?

If it's taken apart, is it worth getting a bigger jet, as it has a race back box on it, and i've just ordered a K&N filter (oil and fuel)?

And final question ...
I've checked the oil, which still looks a healthy colour, but and going to change it anyway, likewise with the spark plug, the air filter is a bit dirty, but that will also be changed, is there anything else I should be looking at for servicing? It's done just shy of 20,000hrs

Thanks in advance :)

Matt
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,280 Posts
20 thousand hours?

Carb cleaner *might* help. Most people here recommend sea foam.

As for other service, check the oil in the differentials and change it. Not sure that machine has a transfer case, but if it does, change that too. Spray 4d-40 or silicon on the CV boots and other rubber parts.

ADDED: Instead of silicon, use a good quality rubber/vinyl protectant. Silicon MAY [or may not] damage rubber long term. I've used 303 protectant for years and like it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,616 Posts
I agree with what Pain said. Welcome to the forums.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
23,581 Posts
Welcome to the forums. You can try seafoam, but I would say that you'll have to take the carb apart and clean it. Your problem is with the float valve and valve seat. Just take your float valve out and clean it and the valve seat real good. While you have it apart, I would go ahead and clean the rest of it anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks guys. Is it a simple job? Don't suppose there is a 'how to' anywhere?

Oh, and I got the hours wrong, under closer inspection (display is very scratched) 1997.7 hrs / 22000 kms sounds a bit better!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
23,581 Posts
Thanks guys. Is it a simple job? Don't suppose there is a 'how to' anywhere?

Oh, and I got the hours wrong, under closer inspection (display is very scratched) 1997.7 hrs / 22000 kms sounds a bit better!
It's not too hard. Here is a link to a free downloadable repair manual for the 350 Rancher. Look under the fuel system section and it will tell you what you need to know. Right click the link below, and then click on "Save Link As" and save the manual to your computer.

http://www3.telus.net/leneng/pdf/Honda_Trx_350_Rancher_Service_Repair_Manual.pdf
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
20 thousand hours?

Carb cleaner *might* help. Most people here recommend sea foam.

As for other service, check the oil in the differentials and change it. Not sure that machine has a transfer case, but if it does, change that too. Spray 4d-40 or silicon on the CV boots and other rubber parts.
is this to protect them and keep them pliable i assume?? :smile:... i thought silicon would dry them out quicker?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,280 Posts
20 thousand hours?

Carb cleaner *might* help. Most people here recommend sea foam.

As for other service, check the oil in the differentials and change it. Not sure that machine has a transfer case, but if it does, change that too. Spray 4d-40 or silicon on the CV boots and other rubber parts.
is this to protect them and keep them pliable i assume?? :smile:... i thought silicon would dry them out quicker?


I personally always use 303 protectent, which is a non-lethal form of armour all. :) Armour all used to have the nasty habit of destroying vinyl. They've since changed the formula, but it still has a bad rep due to all those cracked dash boards of yesteryear.

I don't know about silicon drying it out, frankly. If it does, then my bad. When I don't have 303 [like right now], then I use WD-40. I have used it on my 93 pickup since I've owned it and I've never had a cracked boot.....course I don't know if that means anything or not.

Sort of like the Synth v. petrol based oil debate, I guess. ;) If you use synthetic and have 300k miles on your engine, is it due to the synth oil?

ADDED: From carcareonline.com regarding tire rubber. Not sure this will relate to other rubber or not. Given this, I would suggest not using silicon and go with a good quality rubber/vinyl protectent.....or, not. I personally will continue to usea protectant on rubber.

"There are two main degrading agents that attack tires and rubber trim. They are UV light waves and ozone. Both of these attack the long hydrocarbon chains of the rubber and, by breaking these bonds, shorten the molecules with resulting loss of elasticity and other problems. Tire manufacturers add two primary sacrificial protectants to the rubber. To protect against UV, they add carbon black. This is why tires dont come in designer colors to match your paint.

The carbon black will turn white/gray as it absorbs the UV and dissipates the energy as heat. This is the basis of rubber parts turning gray as they age. To protect against ozone, tire manufacturers add a wax based, sacrificial protectant. The ozone attacks the wax and depletes it. As the tire rolls, additional wax is forced to the surface of the tire. This is referred to as blooming. This blooming refreshes the surface wax protectant. A tire that has not been flexed will have the wax depleted by the ozone and thus begin to degrade and suffer dry rot. The raw silicone oil that is the main ingredient in most of the nationally advertised, auto parts store, high gloss products may actually dissolve the wax and be the cause of premature tire sidewall cracking/failure. The quality tire/rubber dressings should contain a strong UV protectant to bolster the efforts of the carbon black and not contain any raw silicone oil. Many of the nationally advertised rubber and vinyl products also contain formaldehyde. If you plan on having a funeral for your vinyl/rubber, then you may wish to use one of these products. "
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
20 thousand hours?

Carb cleaner *might* help. Most people here recommend sea foam.

As for other service, check the oil in the differentials and change it. Not sure that machine has a transfer case, but if it does, change that too. Spray 4d-40 or silicon on the CV boots and other rubber parts.
is this to protect them and keep them pliable i assume?? :smile:... i thought silicon would dry them out quicker?


I personally always use 303 protectent, which is a non-lethal form of armour all. :) Armour all used to have the nasty habit of destroying vinyl. They've since changed the formula, but it still has a bad rep due to all those cracked dash boards of yesteryear.

I don't know about silicon drying it out, frankly. If it does, then my bad. When I don't have 303 [like right now], then I use WD-40. I have used it on my 93 pickup since I've owned it and I've never had a cracked boot.....course I don't know if that means anything or not.

Sort of like the Synth v. petrol based oil debate, I guess. ;) If you use synthetic and have 300k miles on your engine, is it due to the synth oil?

ADDED: From carcareonline.com regarding tire rubber. Not sure this will relate to other rubber or not. Given this, I would suggest not using silicon and go with a good quality rubber/vinyl protectent.....or, not. I personally will continue to usea protectant on rubber.

"There are two main degrading agents that attack tires and rubber trim. They are UV light waves and ozone. Both of these attack the long hydrocarbon chains of the rubber and, by breaking these bonds, shorten the molecules with resulting loss of elasticity and other problems. Tire manufacturers add two primary sacrificial protectants to the rubber. To protect against UV, they add carbon black. This is why tires dont come in designer colors to match your paint.

The carbon black will turn white/gray as it absorbs the UV and dissipates the energy as heat. This is the basis of rubber parts turning gray as they age. To protect against ozone, tire manufacturers add a wax based, sacrificial protectant. The ozone attacks the wax and depletes it. As the tire rolls, additional wax is forced to the surface of the tire. This is referred to as blooming. This blooming refreshes the surface wax protectant. A tire that has not been flexed will have the wax depleted by the ozone and thus begin to degrade and suffer dry rot. The raw silicone oil that is the main ingredient in most of the nationally advertised, auto parts store, high gloss products may actually dissolve the wax and be the cause of premature tire sidewall cracking/failure. The quality tire/rubber dressings should contain a strong UV protectant to bolster the efforts of the carbon black and not contain any raw silicone oil. Many of the nationally advertised rubber and vinyl products also contain formaldehyde. If you plan on having a funeral for your vinyl/rubber, then you may wish to use one of these products. "
good read... i never use armorall bc of the silicone.. anyhow, the boots on the 98 trax i have is original. never had a coating on it or anything.. thats pertty good if you ask me :)..
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
23,581 Posts
I've read in automotive repair manuals that you are supposed to use silicone to protect rubber bushings and mounts. It said not to use WD-40 or any kind of oil or grease, because it will cause the rubber to dry rot. Again, that's just what I read.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,280 Posts
Guess I'll just get another bottle of 303.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
23,581 Posts
Guess I'll just get another bottle of 303.
I would definitely use what's been working. Nothing better than experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,280 Posts
This is from the 303 site, so it looks like it's not the 'evil' protectant, and it doesn't have a high gloss finish, more of a matte.

"303 Aerospace Protectant keeps UV-sensitive materials "like new" year after year.

Use on Rubber: Tires, neoprene, latex, door and trunk seals, weather-stripping, EPDM rubber roofs, CV boots, waders, wet suits.
Vinyl: Convertible tops (and the clear vinyl windows), isinglass, marine seating, tonneau covers, car bras, covers, spa covers, pool covers.
Inflatable boats: Hypalon, PVC and urethane blends. Gelcoat
fiberglass: Boats, RV's, snowmobiles, jet ski's. Plastics, acrylics,
polycarbonates: Lexan® and acrylic panels, windows, , windshields, covers.
Carbon-fiber/resin composites: Fishing rods, "nude" bike frames.
Finished leather: Upholstery, motorcycle leather, trim, tack, fine apparel. Pool & Patio: Plastic furniture (not fabric), pool inflatables, slides, covers.
Sailcloth: Dacron® and monofilm."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,280 Posts
Oops. Double post.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
23,581 Posts
This is from the 303 site, so it looks like it's not the 'evil' protectant, and it doesn't have a high gloss finish, more of a matte.

"303 Aerospace Protectant keeps UV-sensitive materials "like new" year after year.

Use on Rubber: Tires, neoprene, latex, door and trunk seals, weather-stripping, EPDM rubber roofs, CV boots, waders, wet suits.
Vinyl: Convertible tops (and the clear vinyl windows), isinglass, marine seating, tonneau covers, car bras, covers, spa covers, pool covers.
Inflatable boats: Hypalon, PVC and urethane blends. Gelcoat
fiberglass: Boats, RV's, snowmobiles, jet ski's. Plastics, acrylics,
polycarbonates: Lexan® and acrylic panels, windows, , windshields, covers.
Carbon-fiber/resin composites: Fishing rods, "nude" bike frames.
Finished leather: Upholstery, motorcycle leather, trim, tack, fine apparel. Pool & Patio: Plastic furniture (not fabric), pool inflatables, slides, covers.
Sailcloth: Dacron® and monofilm."
Pain, that looks to be an excellent choice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
This is from the 303 site, so it looks like it's not the 'evil' protectant, and it doesn't have a high gloss finish, more of a matte.

"303 Aerospace Protectant keeps UV-sensitive materials "like new" year after year.

Use on Rubber: Tires, neoprene, latex, door and trunk seals, weather-stripping, EPDM rubber roofs, CV boots, waders, wet suits.
Vinyl: Convertible tops (and the clear vinyl windows), isinglass, marine seating, tonneau covers, car bras, covers, spa covers, pool covers.
Inflatable boats: Hypalon, PVC and urethane blends. Gelcoat
fiberglass: Boats, RV's, snowmobiles, jet ski's. Plastics, acrylics,
polycarbonates: Lexan® and acrylic panels, windows, , windshields, covers.
Carbon-fiber/resin composites: Fishing rods, "nude" bike frames.
Finished leather: Upholstery, motorcycle leather, trim, tack, fine apparel. Pool & Patio: Plastic furniture (not fabric), pool inflatables, slides, covers.
Sailcloth: Dacron® and monofilm."

nice i may have to look into that.. my boots are cracking where it bends (its 12yrs old) but they have not split yet.

went to the 303 website and for 7 bucks you can get free samples.. may have to try it out
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,280 Posts
For 7 bucks you can get free samples?

heheh, I know what you meant. Click on the link to find a local retailer in your area. If there is, maybe you can buy a bottle of the stuff for 7 bucks.

I always thought it was strictly mail order, but I found a seller up the road from me and I'll go see if they have any. Hopefully they do so I don't have to pay shipping. I used to buy the stuff with other detailing supplies but I don't need anything else right now.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top