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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Parts came to put my 450s back together and I noticed that the diff plate/cover didn't have a gasket but a flexible material was used. I was thinking a flexible permatex, but curious if there is a recommended material that I'd get at a local auto store.

Thanks - Dan
 

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Parts came to put my 450s back together and I noticed that the diff plate/cover didn't have a gasket but a flexible material was used. I was thinking a flexible permatex, but curious if there is a recommended material that I'd get at a local auto store.

Thanks - Dan
best stuff i ever use ..it's called yamaha bond..yeah yeah..it has the name yamaha..lol..but..it works really well..you can get it at a honda/yamaha dealer..it don't cost alot..and i've never had any issues with it..you can even seal the rocker boxes up with it..as you probally already know..rocker boxes don't have any gaskets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
best stuff i ever use ..it's called yamaha bond..yeah yeah..it has the name yamaha..lol..but..it works really well..you can get it at a honda/yamaha dealer..it don't cost alot..and i've never had any issues with it..you can even seal the rocker boxes up with it..as you probally already know..rocker boxes don't have any gaskets.
Thanks Shadetree.........I drive by a Yamaha dealer on my way home, I'll pick some up.
 

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best stuff i ever use ..it's called yamaha bond..yeah yeah..it has the name yamaha..lol..but..it works really well..you can get it at a honda/yamaha dealer..it don't cost alot..and i've never had any issues with it..you can even seal the rocker boxes up with it..as you probally already know..rocker boxes don't have any gaskets.
Thanks Shadetree.........I drive by a Yamaha dealer on my way home, I'll pick some up.
I would use Hondabond, it's way better than Yamabond, and it's what was originally used from the factory. Yamabond will work, but I don't like it near as good as Hondabond.
 

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best stuff i ever use ..it's called yamaha bond..yeah yeah..it has the name yamaha..lol..but..it works really well..you can get it at a honda/yamaha dealer..it don't cost alot..and i've never had any issues with it..you can even seal the rocker boxes up with it..as you probally already know..rocker boxes don't have any gaskets.
Thanks Shadetree.........I drive by a Yamaha dealer on my way home, I'll pick some up.
I would use Hondabond, it's way better than Yamabond, and it's what was originally used from the factory. Yamabond will work, but I don't like it near as good as Hondabond.
lol..same stuff..with a different name on it..look at the ingredints..same stuff i bet..just they put honda on the tube..instead of yamaha..lol.
 

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Thanks Shadetree.........I drive by a Yamaha dealer on my way home, I'll pick some up.
I would use Hondabond, it's way better than Yamabond, and it's what was originally used from the factory. Yamabond will work, but I don't like it near as good as Hondabond.
lol..same stuff..with a different name on it..look at the ingredints..same stuff i bet..just they put honda on the tube..instead of yamaha..lol.
No, I bought a tube of Yamabond once, because I thought it was the same stuff. It was completely different.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Stopped at the Honda dealer on the way home and bought a tube of Hondabond along with some honda rear end hypoid grease. I just figured I'd stick with the name on the wheeler. Was going to stop at the Yamaha dealer for another item but didn't have time. Even though this is a Honda site I'll ask anyway..........I've got a 1988 Yamaha Bigwheel 350ES motorcycle that's acting like I'm running out of clutch........how hard is it to add a new clutch pad or whatever goes into a motorcycle clutch?

An interesting aside as to why I have the bigwheel.........we go elk hunting to Idaho every fall and there are some trails that are closed to 4 wheel atvs but open to 2 wheel motorcycles. I put a rack on the front and a bigger rear sprocket on the big wheel and it's saved us a bunch of sweat (or the cost of hiring a horse) a couple of times.

Thanks for all the advice - Dan
 

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Stopped at the Honda dealer on the way home and bought a tube of Hondabond along with some honda rear end hypoid grease. I just figured I'd stick with the name on the wheeler. Was going to stop at the Yamaha dealer for another item but didn't have time. Even though this is a Honda site I'll ask anyway..........I've got a 1988 Yamaha Bigwheel 350ES motorcycle that's acting like I'm running out of clutch........how hard is it to add a new clutch pad or whatever goes into a motorcycle clutch?

An interesting aside as to why I have the bigwheel.........we go elk hunting to Idaho every fall and there are some trails that are closed to 4 wheel atvs but open to 2 wheel motorcycles. I put a rack on the front and a bigger rear sprocket on the big wheel and it's saved us a bunch of sweat (or the cost of hiring a horse) a couple of times.

Thanks for all the advice - Dan
there isn't much difference in clutches from a atv to a motor cycle..they both use the wet clutch basket disk..you shouldn't have much trouble doing your bike..oh..and i'm rebuilding a yamaha jet ski..soo..your safe saying yamaha....lmfao.
 

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Stopped at the Honda dealer on the way home and bought a tube of Hondabond along with some honda rear end hypoid grease. I just figured I'd stick with the name on the wheeler. Was going to stop at the Yamaha dealer for another item but didn't have time. Even though this is a Honda site I'll ask anyway..........I've got a 1988 Yamaha Bigwheel 350ES motorcycle that's acting like I'm running out of clutch........how hard is it to add a new clutch pad or whatever goes into a motorcycle clutch?

An interesting aside as to why I have the bigwheel.........we go elk hunting to Idaho every fall and there are some trails that are closed to 4 wheel atvs but open to 2 wheel motorcycles. I put a rack on the front and a bigger rear sprocket on the big wheel and it's saved us a bunch of sweat (or the cost of hiring a horse) a couple of times.

Thanks for all the advice - Dan
there isn't much difference in clutches from a atv to a motor cycle..they both use the wet clutch basket disk..you shouldn't have much trouble doing your bike..oh..and i'm rebuilding a yamaha jet ski..soo..your safe saying yamaha....lmfao.
I agree with Shadetree. The clutch in a motorcycle is about the same setup as an ATV. Not much difference, probably a little easier than a utility model ATV, because the utility models have more parts for the clutch linkage. A motorcycle has the manual clutch, so it has a cable and a few less parts. The clutch in a motorcycle is setup identical to the clutch in a sport ATV. If you can replace the clutches in an ATV, then you shouldn't have any problem with a motorcycle.

BTW, I own 2 Yamahas. LOL.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks Shadetree and Helmut.............I've read up a bit on changing a motorcycle clutch. The clutch currently has plenty of grab, just running out of throw. So my question is should I order a kit with springs, discs, and friction plates?......or just the friction plates?

Sounds like most guys just get the friction plates?

Thanks - Dan
 

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Thanks Shadetree and Helmut.............I've read up a bit on changing a motorcycle clutch. The clutch currently has plenty of grab, just running out of throw. So my question is should I order a kit with springs, discs, and friction plates?......or just the friction plates?

Sounds like most guys just get the friction plates?

Thanks - Dan
If it isn't slipping, you might be able to adjust it at the cable.

I usually just get friction plates, but it would probably be better to get new springs too. Don't forget to soak the friction discs in oil before you install them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
If it isn't slipping, you might be able to adjust it at the cable.

I usually just get friction plates, but it would probably be better to get new springs too. Don't forget to soak the friction discs in oil before you install them.
It isn't slipping, but the last time I adjusted it I disconnected the cable from the lever on the engine to see how much throw was left, and there was very little. I've owned it since it was new so I know it has never had the clutch replaced. It's up at the inlaws with the 300 fourtrax, so I wanted to get all the parts I'd need before driving the 100 miles up.

There was a real nice youtube video showing a motorcycle clutch being replaced, and he recommended soaking the friction plates in oil too.

Thanks again Helmut - Dan
 
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