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I hope she likes it!! Thats awesome your mom will even get on a sled and quad. My mom wants nothing to do with them. I look forward to watching this thread. Retro you make your bikes cleaner than when they left the showroom floor.
 

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Discussion Starter #22 (Edited)
Well, she is 78, but I noticed that she has slowed down a lot now that she lives nearby... she still does everything she wants to, just slower. Still wants to be independent and do all the things she enjoys doing outdoors without asking for help though. She will use her ATV a lot this summer me thinks, even for trail riding through the woods for fun, and for showing her visiting grandkids all the cool places she has explored.

I won't be doing a frame up resto on this one though. Just intend to tear it down far enough to get eyeballs on most of the major moving parts and clean and repack all the bearings, replace seals and bushings and any worn out/broken/missing parts that I find along the way. I don't care whether it is ever shiny or not. I just don't like to fix problems one at a time on machines in the order as they might occur.... that approach can cause me to become stranded somewhere and chasing occasional gremlins wastes a lot of my time.

I prefer doing complete teardowns to service everything at once to head off any potential breakdowns or failures that might be avoidable. I feel like I am saving a lot money and time on repairs and maintenance when I can clean and repack an old bearing that might last for many more years, if only it had plenty of good clean grease in it. In my view, it is just an act of taking routine preventive maintenance chores one step further.

I own and depend daily on a LOT of very old equipment. All of my durable and reliable old-school machines were torn down and serviced as soon as I got them, before ever being put to work. I do the same teardown procedures on every brand new machine I buy too! New machines need them the most! I simply repeat those routine teardown sessions on each one every several years. My repair hours and costs each year usually total very near to 0 hours and $0.00. I spend my time and money on thorough, scheduled (at my convenience) maintenance sessions instead...

Which means I worry less about anything breaking down when I need it the most. And I rarely have to scrounge for and spend a fortune on any obsolete parts. I NEVER buy any china stuff when it is an avoidable consequence. Being that I am a hardcore tightwad and a practicing cheapskate, this attitude and approach works the best for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #23 (Edited)
It finally stopped snowing early this morning, so this afternoon I spent some time looking the Rancher over out under a bright sun for the first time. It is still pretty grungy looking on the tops of the plastic surfaces I noticed right away. I'm sure everything will wash clean and bright with some hot soapy water and a scrub brush though. One piece at a time...

I noticed in one of those roadside pics that I took the day I bought this, that a front rack bracket was bent where the left side top of the fender mounts through a rubber grommet. So first thing today I checked that out and noticed the front bumper and rack are bent (you'll see what I mean in the pics I'll soon post) in a little. Luckily the plastic fender wasn't found cracked or damaged around that grommet. The bumper and rack are made of light tubing so they should be easy to straighten back where they belong. No kinks or dents in either one, so no worries. I hadn't noticed any of that while I was checking the bike over in the man's garage.

I also noticed that several black plastic push pins are missing that hold plastics together in a few areas. I'll buy a package of 100 to replace them and keep the rest for spares.

One bolt (of two) is missing that holds the right foot peg down. One black plastic wheel cap is missing as well.

In the trunk I found the Owners Manual inside its compartment along with a new NGK spark plug. But the toolkit and the gear shift wrench are missing. Those were added to the parts list to be replaced as well.

It looks like a mouse began to build a nest inside the airbox, but must have abandoned it right away. The air filter inside was still clean and oiled, so maybe the little critter found a more pleasant living room in someone else' vehicle nearby. No harm done there... and no wiring or hoses were found chewed on the bike. Everything else on the bike checks out fine so far.

Next up, I opened the drain on the float bowl and let that empty out. It was still liquid, but a green and smelly liquid... So I unhooked the hose coming from the tank and slipped a short length of hose over the inlet nipple and stuck a small funnel in it. I poured some of my premium 32:1 chain saw premix into the funnel to fill the bowl, then opened the drain again to flush it out a bit. I closed it back up and filled the float bowl with premix again. I put a battery in it, then yanked the air filter and squirted a bit of premix into the carb... turned the key on and tested the shift buttons... R-N-1-N... Sweet!!!

So I pulled the choke and pushed the button and it fired right up! I let it idle for about 20 seconds (the hour meter rolled over to 500.0 hours as it was idling) then shut it down. It sounded pretty darn good to me, so now I can continue the rehab without worry or wonder about a gazillion "what ifs". :)

The reason I was not 100% confident with the motor until now, is because the hose on my old-school made-in-the-USA compression tester cracked open while I was trying to screw it into the 12mm adapter (already threaded into the head) in the man's garage. The angle I had to bend it around as I twisted on the hose was severe and in the cold air temp the hose cracked open. I had tried to hold the crack shut with one hand while the other hand pressed the starter button, but I couldn't make the hose airtight. The building pressure would blow off through the cracked hose. 55 lbs is as high as I saw the gauge go on a hit, so I used other simple clues (no evidence of oil or soot in the exhaust, it wiped clean and dry. The spark plug came out tan color too, no soot, carbon or shiny oil deposits on it) to form my opinion. The Odometer read 4,723 miles. The hourmeter read 499.9 total hours. I also had the man's word that it was all good. Now I am 100% confident that his word is good too! :)

Creamsicle is a gift me thinks!!! :)

Due up next: Pre-teardown PIC PORN. I am about 20% into the teardown right now, so this is the only pic dump you'll see of the "Before" condition of Creamsicle. I added a shot of the color code (YR-222R) sticker too. Honda calls it "Zest Orange" in parts fiche listings.
 

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Nice Rancher! I like that color, don’t see it that often. Around here they go for $2,000-$2,500. Some ask over $3,000 for them with a plow.

I’m interested to see what you get for compression. My 2001 ES compression was at 87 one time then 77 another time with 600 hours.
 

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Retro, BTW: welcome to the ES Club. We are told that our ES’s are no good, are nothing but problems, always break, never buy one of those, not as good as the others. We are told to get rid of some of our parts to be like the others, they remind us to keep our batteries charged, like we don’t know that!

We know ES’s are not perfect, but and at the end of the day they work well, are reliable and are enjoyable to drive. What else could anyone want?

Welcome to our great happy club! We could use someone like you to be our club Vice President.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Very nice bike retro!

Its in great shape!

If you end up changing the tires have fun getting those cheng shinner's off...LOL

They are near one with the rim!
Thanks! I got a trick for getting ATV tires off the rims... let all of the air out of them except for about 1 pound of pressure, then pop the bead on one side... Put air to it again until that popped bead begins to reseal and you have about 1 pound of air in the tire again. Then pop the other bead loose from the rim. Try it next time...!
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Welcome to our great happy club! We could use someone like you to be our club Vice President.
First Menard_LaPue now you..! :)

I'd be a bigger fan of ES if the UP shift button were mounted on the underside of the left foot shifter lever and the DOWN shift button were on the top of that shifter lever. LOL
 

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Pushed some snow w the 02 Rancher ES today now she has 7000 miles
 

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You got to love fly by wire technology ------- I would like to see the numbers on how many angle sensors Honda has sold since coming out with ES , I know some say they never had a problem in many , many miles , but if you really look around and listen , they are a nightmare and don't preform nearly as well -----

I think they should come with a handicap plate on the rear ---------- Retro , if I got you a handicap plate would you stick it on !
 

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Discussion Starter #37
LMAO! One of those reflective-orange Disabled Vehicle kits might fit in the trunk too! Flare gun sold separately, of course. LOL :)

You are right about angle sensor sales for sure. Those have probably been one of Honda's biggest replacement part sales of all time! I think many of them that are purchased are unneeded though... many folks like to buy first--test later.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
I have been putting a few hours of time into this project (almost every day) and finally got all of the old rotting fuel and mouse messes cleaned out of the fuel and induction systems. I put everything back on the bike for more thorough testing a couple days ago, because I wanted to get it running (and driving) to learn whether this thing has any unknown issues or not... before I begin to tear it all down again into a gazillion pieces. More on that later...

The fuel tank, petcock, fuel gauge and carb were in terrible shape inside. Everything was coated in thick, green goo (some wet, some dried and caked on) and I found that some corrosion had also taken hold on the brass jets in the carb.

So the carb was completely stripped down and soaked in Berrymans for two whole days... every few hours whenever I had time I would take parts out of the solvent for brushing and scrubbing to help loosen the green stuff, then I'd blow parts out with compressed air and return them to the soak. The brass jets would not come completely clean, so I had to boil them in Lemon juice to remove the last bits of caked on green stuff and bring the shine back in the corroded areas. I probably have 12-14 hours of time invested in the carb alone (not counting those two days of soak time), but it all cleaned up and blew out really nice! I didn't even need to buy a new carb kit... just worked hard at it and found all of the rubber parts in good condition once they got scrubbed clean! I am going to replace all of the brass jets with new OEM jets though, because I think the corrosion has probably compromised them due to pitting. I found one short vent hose cracked open that I will replace as well. Other than those few minor parts needing replaced, the carb survived in perfect condition. I am very pleased with it.

The inside of the fuel tank was a lot easier to clean up using only hot water and some good ole' Tide laundry soap, along with only a couple hours of my time.

The fuel gauge was looking pretty rough. I priced them out looking for an easy way out of that mess, but changed my mind right away. Honda wants a fortune for that simple little float-style fuel gauge! Once I got it all apart though, I felt like I might be able to fix it so I went to work on it. I began by buffing out the yellowing on both sides of the plastic lens bezel with some buffing compound on a damp microfiber cloth. It cleared right up when I tried that! So I scrub-brush cleaned the other parts of the gauge with some soap and followed up with some alcohol on a microfiber. Then put it all back together carefully using some silicone o-ring grease on the sealing areas of the rubber parts. The black clamp that holds the gauge in the top of the tank was a little buggered up, so that got sanded down smooth and repainted. I was glad I didn't give up on it cause it turned out pretty nice!

The petcock was hopeless looking. It was totally plugged off, the valve was seized tight and it looked overall like a corroded piece of junk. The plastic filter screen inside was literally falling apart in pieces from bad fuel rot. So again I looked up the price for a new OEM petcock set... hilarious... no stinkin' way man! And they want over $20 shipped just for that china looking plastic screen!

So I took a walk and got my small drill press out of the shed, then scrounged through drawers until I found one of my drill bit sets and I began to take that ugly chunk of scrap apart. For two whole days I worked on it off and on whenever I found some time... and I eventually won. It is perfectly clean, all corrosion is gone and it is polished brightly again inside and out. I reassembled the valve using silicone o-ring grease on the rubber parts and I was able to save everything in it ($0.00) except for the rotted plastic screen. For that I intend to roll my own using some #300 mesh stainless steel screen for a permanent (and cheap!) fix.

The airbox (with a partial mouse nest in the bottom), the snorkel tube and the air filter were in very good condition. I took the airbox and snorkel tube apart and scrubbed every part clean and put them back together. The air filter got washed real good in hot soapy water 3 or 4 times... then rinsed well 3 or 4 times and allowed to dry completely. There was no sand or silt that washed out of the foam, so I doubt that it had been on the bike very long before it was parked. I then reoiled the foam lightly with some of my Stihl chainsaw (blue jug) bar and chain oil. That stuff is very sticky and won't ever dry out... its my all-time favorite (cheap) filter oil. K&N gots nothing better to sell to me anymore... :)

I didn't take any pics while I worked on any of those messes, but everything is coming back off from the bike right away, so I'll shoot some pics in a couple days or so... once I have them back out where we can all see them. My next post has some pics though... :)
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Before I began to put everything back on the bike that I have cleaned up and repaired to do some testing... Well, I did some other stuffs... :)

The valves (both were found at .007") were readjusted to .006" each. The spark plug was regapped to .035". The clutch was readjusted to 1/4-turn freeplay. Both diffs were drained (both were full of clean oil) and the oil in them replaced with Mobil 1 synthetic 75w90. The fan motor assembly was taken off and scrubbed clean, then a hole was drilled in the end cap for oiling the rear bearing (a hypo needle shoved under the seal oiled the other bearing) and the hole was resealed with 3M adhesive. The motor oil (it was light brown in color and smelled very old) was drained, the oil filter cut open for inspection, and the oil cooler and lines were removed to be flushed out with mineral spirits, followed by alcohol, then clean motor oil, and finally blown clear with compressed air before filled with motor oil and put back on the frame. The oil temp/fan motor circuit was tested and found to be good to go. The baffle in the muffler was taken out for cleaning. The airbox, carb and tank assemblies were then put back on the bike with some fresh premium ethanol-free gas dumped in the tank. All cables readjusted. The motor was refilled with Rotella T4 15w40 oil along with a new oil filter. A battery was put back in it, primed the carb two pumps, yanked the choke out and it cranked and started right up.

I adjusted the idle speed up a bit and let it run for about 10 minutes to warm up. It sounded like a new Honda to me... no mechanical noises in the motor whatsoever.... quiet as a church mouse. After it was warmed I adjusted the idle mixture and idle speed. Then climbed on and took it for a ride out my driveway and down the road. I shifted up and down through the gears several times and checked the reverse shift a few times. The ES shifter worked like every other I was thinking... They are all noisy, slow, and annoying, in my opinion. Then I turned it around and run it back toward my driveway hard through the gears. It sounded good and strong, but I wanted to know more about the clutches...? So I stopped, then screamed through all the gears again... still no slip. So I slowed down to about 20 MPH in 5th... and pegged it again, dogging it hard from the bottom up, again listening close for any slipping clutches. Big smile, the motor might get to stay in the frame this go 'round?

Just one more test to pass... and my busted compression tester hose just got replaced. Lets go boys... :)
 

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Discussion Starter #40 (Edited)
Honda states in the service manual that the compression should read 97 PSI on a warmed up motor. So I let the hot motor cool down a while after beating on it out on the road, thinking it might be a bit too hot to work on right away. When I finally come back with my tools and compression tester the motor had cooled off almost cold to the touch on the head, so I started it up again and let it idle for a couple minutes.

I took the rolled metal gasket off from my new spark plug and screwed it onto my 12mm adapter to insure I could get a good seal on the head. Those rubber o-rings on adapters sometimes squeeze out under pressure. This time everything held up and I got the same good reading three times in a row. I'll call that a 93...? and with 500 hours on the motor that's close enough to 97 to suit me fine. The motor stays in the frame! :)

I'm gonna run this oil & filter for a couple more hours then change it again. I'll put Rotella T6 in it along with another filter cutting and oil cooler flushing.
 

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