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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently installed the SuperATV disc brake conversion kit on my 300, which I am very satisfied with. But, the brakes were still spongy, like they were with the drum brakes. I knew that the disc brakes were working well, so the only thing it could be would be old (18 years old) hoses that were swelling under pressure. So, I embarked on finding a set of braided hoses.
I had contacted Galfer, but I had a hard time with the website, and when I did get to the order page, I had to print it, fill it out, and either fax or scan it. I'm sort of impatient, so I kept looking. I found a Galfer set on ebay, for the 450R. No one makes a ready-made set for the 300, but the more I studied the set for the 450, the more I was convinced that it could work. I ordered a set-

Galfer Stainless Steel Hyd Front Brake Line Honda TRX450R TRX450ER FK003D418-3 | eBay

They shipped and arrived fast, and I installed them this morning. one side hose is a couple of inches longer than the other, but other than that, the set worked perfect. I did bend the fittings at the calipers to keep the lines away from the tires, but that was the only alteration. Everything else worked out well, and when braking, the handle is firm, and the discs grabbed better.

One observation. If I had realized that the brake hoses were swelling, I would have most likely replaced them first, to see if the drums would then work like they did when the atv was new. Between buying the disc conversion kit, new rims and tires, and the hose set, I've spent close to $900. I don't regret it, but if money is tight, I would recommend addressing the hoses before the drum brakes.

 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I took my 300 out for a long ride yesterday. The front discs are SUCH an improvement over the drums, but the braided lines made the biggest difference, of all. I highly recommend the SuperATV kit, and Galfer braided lines.
 

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Awesome find. I've noticed now that I've had my HL front disc kit on for a month or so that I have to pump the brakes a few times to get them to really bite. I'll be putting this kit on in the next week.
 

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I had ordered a set made by Raceline from ebay (company had gone out of biz a few years ago and a MX shop was selling off some NOS hose kits for the 450R for $23).

Got them installed last night. The main hose from the MC wasn't quite as long as what you've got pictured in the first post, so I used bracket that holds the main hose just above the factory distribution block to mount the new distribution block. I think I'm going to make an offset bracket to mount the block since the hoses are not equal length.

Started bleeding the brakes and quite honestly, just quit after a while and will go back to finish it up tonight. They were taking forever to bleed and I was so tired I couldn't keep messing with it. I'll finish it tonight, but I think this is going to be a great upgrade.

Oh, and the hose I got were black stainless. They look great!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I had ordered a set made by Raceline from ebay (company had gone out of biz a few years ago and a MX shop was selling off some NOS hose kits for the 450R for $23).

Got them installed last night. The main hose from the MC wasn't quite as long as what you've got pictured in the first post, so I used bracket that holds the main hose just above the factory distribution block to mount the new distribution block. I think I'm going to make an offset bracket to mount the block since the hoses are not equal length.

Started bleeding the brakes and quite honestly, just quit after a while and will go back to finish it up tonight. They were taking forever to bleed and I was so tired I couldn't keep messing with it. I'll finish it tonight, but I think this is going to be a great upgrade.

Oh, and the hose I got were black stainless. They look great!
Interesting- mine were easy to bleed. Are you sure you aren't drawing air from somewhere?
I am still fine-tuning the routing.
 

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I had ordered a set made by Raceline from ebay (company had gone out of biz a few years ago and a MX shop was selling off some NOS hose kits for the 450R for $23).

Got them installed last night. The main hose from the MC wasn't quite as long as what you've got pictured in the first post, so I used bracket that holds the main hose just above the factory distribution block to mount the new distribution block. I think I'm going to make an offset bracket to mount the block since the hoses are not equal length.

Started bleeding the brakes and quite honestly, just quit after a while and will go back to finish it up tonight. They were taking forever to bleed and I was so tired I couldn't keep messing with it. I'll finish it tonight, but I think this is going to be a great upgrade.

Oh, and the hose I got were black stainless. They look great!
Interesting- mine were easy to bleed. Are you sure you aren't drawing air from somewhere?
I am still fine-tuning the routing.
I'm probably drawing air in from the bleeder screws. Once I got some fluid into the new lines from the MC, I realized that I forgot to put the crush washers on the caliper side of the brake fitting. DOH!!! So I had to pull them back off and put the 2nd washer on both calipers. That kinda screwed up my process and after that I just quit and hit the shower so I could go to bed.

I have to route the hoses on the back side of the shocks, which sucks since you can't use the factory mounting points to secure the hoses. But it was the same with the factory hoses and the HighLifter disc brake kit, since the caliper is on the back side as opposed to the brake fitting fitting on the front of the drum.

I just zip tie the hoses to the tie rod and check to make sure they have enough slack when the wheels are turned and the suspension is traveling.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I had ordered a set made by Raceline from ebay (company had gone out of biz a few years ago and a MX shop was selling off some NOS hose kits for the 450R for $23).

Got them installed last night. The main hose from the MC wasn't quite as long as what you've got pictured in the first post, so I used bracket that holds the main hose just above the factory distribution block to mount the new distribution block. I think I'm going to make an offset bracket to mount the block since the hoses are not equal length.

Started bleeding the brakes and quite honestly, just quit after a while and will go back to finish it up tonight. They were taking forever to bleed and I was so tired I couldn't keep messing with it. I'll finish it tonight, but I think this is going to be a great upgrade.

Oh, and the hose I got were black stainless. They look great!
Interesting- mine were easy to bleed. Are you sure you aren't drawing air from somewhere?
I am still fine-tuning the routing.
I'm probably drawing air in from the bleeder screws. Once I got some fluid into the new lines from the MC, I realized that I forgot to put the crush washers on the caliper side of the brake fitting. DOH!!! So I had to pull them back off and put the 2nd washer on both calipers. That kinda screwed up my process and after that I just quit and hit the shower so I could go to bed.

I have to route the hoses on the back side of the shocks, which sucks since you can't use the factory mounting points to secure the hoses. But it was the same with the factory hoses and the HighLifter disc brake kit, since the caliper is on the back side as opposed to the brake fitting fitting on the front of the drum.

I just zip tie the hoses to the tie rod and check to make sure they have enough slack when the wheels are turned and the suspension is traveling.
That's what I've done, currently. I do not want them attached to the tie rods, but they move well with them, and it keeps them out of the way of the rims. I did bend about a 15 degree angle to the banjo fittings, but I think that a 45 degree bend would be best for routing. I'm not going to try that, and I'm not to the point of buying new side hoses with the proper bends. It all works, but it isn't as neat and tidy as I'd prefer. But, the brake function is great, and the way they should have been when new.
 

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Interesting- mine were easy to bleed. Are you sure you aren't drawing air from somewhere?
I am still fine-tuning the routing.
I'm probably drawing air in from the bleeder screws. Once I got some fluid into the new lines from the MC, I realized that I forgot to put the crush washers on the caliper side of the brake fitting. DOH!!! So I had to pull them back off and put the 2nd washer on both calipers. That kinda screwed up my process and after that I just quit and hit the shower so I could go to bed.

I have to route the hoses on the back side of the shocks, which sucks since you can't use the factory mounting points to secure the hoses. But it was the same with the factory hoses and the HighLifter disc brake kit, since the caliper is on the back side as opposed to the brake fitting fitting on the front of the drum.

I just zip tie the hoses to the tie rod and check to make sure they have enough slack when the wheels are turned and the suspension is traveling.
That's what I've done, currently. I do not want them attached to the tie rods, but they move well with them, and it keeps them out of the way of the rims. I did bend about a 15 degree angle to the banjo fittings, but I think that a 45 degree bend would be best for routing. I'm not going to try that, and I'm not to the point of buying new side hoses with the proper bends. It all works, but it isn't as neat and tidy as I'd prefer. But, the brake function is great, and the way they should have been when new.
The lines I got already have close to a 45 degree bend in them, and they will clear the wheels perfectly. I'm trying to find some dual-clamps to attach to the tie rods instead of zip ties, so at least the hose won't be rubbing on them when they move. I can't seem to find the correct size yet though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I'm probably drawing air in from the bleeder screws. Once I got some fluid into the new lines from the MC, I realized that I forgot to put the crush washers on the caliper side of the brake fitting. DOH!!! So I had to pull them back off and put the 2nd washer on both calipers. That kinda screwed up my process and after that I just quit and hit the shower so I could go to bed.

I have to route the hoses on the back side of the shocks, which sucks since you can't use the factory mounting points to secure the hoses. But it was the same with the factory hoses and the HighLifter disc brake kit, since the caliper is on the back side as opposed to the brake fitting fitting on the front of the drum.

I just zip tie the hoses to the tie rod and check to make sure they have enough slack when the wheels are turned and the suspension is traveling.
That's what I've done, currently. I do not want them attached to the tie rods, but they move well with them, and it keeps them out of the way of the rims. I did bend about a 15 degree angle to the banjo fittings, but I think that a 45 degree bend would be best for routing. I'm not going to try that, and I'm not to the point of buying new side hoses with the proper bends. It all works, but it isn't as neat and tidy as I'd prefer. But, the brake function is great, and the way they should have been when new.
The lines I got already have close to a 45 degree bend in them, and they will clear the wheels perfectly. I'm trying to find some dual-clamps to attach to the tie rods instead of zip ties, so at least the hose won't be rubbing on them when they move. I can't seem to find the correct size yet though.
I bought these-
Aluminium Brake Line Clamps for Honda TRX90 TRX250 TRX300 TRX400 TRX450 TRX700

I haven't put them on, yet, but I think they are going to work.
 

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I've seen those. Do they mount to the control arm?

Also, just curious, but what's stopping from flipping the brackets and calipers to the other side of the bike so that it's on the front of the rotor instead of the rear? This way the hoses can be routed the correct way.

Also, Hodge, did you use the little hose retainer on the caliper with the new brake hoses, or just use the double crush washers?

Last question: how was your lever feel afterwards? I've bled and bled and bled the system, and no air is left in it at all. My lever doesn't feel mushy, but it feels....soft I guess? It's definitely not firm where I squeeze the lever and it's instant locked in rock solid. But about halfway through the pull and I can't turn the rotors by hand.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Crush washers.
Flipping would work- I read where another member here did it- but, that puts the calipers in the line of fire, rather than protected behind the arms and axle. I had thought about doing it, but I'd rather deal with the line routing, than the calipers being vulnerable.
They clamp on to the upper or lower arm tubing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Mine sit completely inside my wheel but I guess it would still be more vulnerable. Good point that I hadn't really thought of.

Did you see my edit in the last post about brake lever feel?
Sorry- I hadn't seen the edit. My lever pull, after the hose replacement, became smooth and firm. I could clearly tell that there had been swelling in the rubber hoses, and now there wasn't. There is the stroke of the lever until the calipers close tight, then a solid stop.
Can you have someone operate the handle while you watch things below? The movement of the calipers, make sure there are any kinks and movement in the new lines, or any slight leaks? Then, you can rule out everything else, and focus on the master cylinder. There could be a problem there. Obviously there is all new fluid in the system. Could there be some debris in the bottom, affecting fluid flow?
 

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Mine sit completely inside my wheel but I guess it would still be more vulnerable. Good point that I hadn't really thought of.

Did you see my edit in the last post about brake lever feel?
Sorry- I hadn't seen the edit. My lever pull, after the hose replacement, became smooth and firm. I could clearly tell that there had been swelling in the rubber hoses, and now there wasn't. There is the stroke of the lever until the calipers close tight, then a solid stop.
Can you have someone operate the handle while you watch things below? The movement of the calipers, make sure there are any kinks and movement in the new lines, or any slight leaks? Then, you can rule out everything else, and focus on the master cylinder. There could be a problem there. Obviously there is all new fluid in the system. Could there be some debris in the bottom, affecting fluid flow?
I'm actually thinking that I need to pull the retaining clips off of the hose ends at the caliper, and bleed the system again. The only spot that I find even the slightest of fluid leakage, is between the caliper and the retaining clip on the left side.

Based on your description, I'd say that mine feels very similar. It's a smooth pull until about 1/2-3/4 of the way, then it locks up solid. I guess I was just expecting it to be a firm pull from the start, but it certainly beats having to pump the lever a few times to get the brakes to engage.

Thanks again for taking the leap to buy and try the lines, and sharing your info with the rest of us.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Mine sit completely inside my wheel but I guess it would still be more vulnerable. Good point that I hadn't really thought of.

Did you see my edit in the last post about brake lever feel?
Sorry- I hadn't seen the edit. My lever pull, after the hose replacement, became smooth and firm. I could clearly tell that there had been swelling in the rubber hoses, and now there wasn't. There is the stroke of the lever until the calipers close tight, then a solid stop.
Can you have someone operate the handle while you watch things below? The movement of the calipers, make sure there are any kinks and movement in the new lines, or any slight leaks? Then, you can rule out everything else, and focus on the master cylinder. There could be a problem there. Obviously there is all new fluid in the system. Could there be some debris in the bottom, affecting fluid flow?
I'm actually thinking that I need to pull the retaining clips off of the hose ends at the caliper, and bleed the system again. The only spot that I find even the slightest of fluid leakage, is between the caliper and the retaining clip on the left side.

Based on your description, I'd say that mine feels very similar. It's a smooth pull until about 1/2-3/4 of the way, then it locks up solid. I guess I was just expecting it to be a firm pull from the start, but it certainly beats having to pump the lever a few times to get the brakes to engage.

Thanks again for taking the leap to buy and try the lines, and sharing your info with the rest of us.
Absolutely! Glad to give back.
 

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Crush washers.
Flipping would work- I read where another member here did it- but, that puts the calipers in the line of fire, rather than protected behind the arms and axle. I had thought about doing it, but I'd rather deal with the line routing, than the calipers being vulnerable.
They clamp on to the upper or lower arm tubing.
not that it matters ?, but my '05 trx500fm has the oem calipers mounted on the front side of the knuckles. from what I can tell ?, they stick inside the rims anyway.
 
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