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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
my 2003 450 Foreman is having starter problems. it all started when, instead of cranking when i pushed the starter button it would click in the battery compartment, since then I have replaced the solenoid then the battery and 2 starters. Now the starter starts the engine and will not turn off when i release the button. I hooked a volt meter to the hot wire that powers the starter and it shows 12.5 volts once i press the starter button and stays hot even when the key is out and the engine is not running. i have to unhook the battery to stop power to the wire. sometimes if flick the button violently it will turn off. I have burned up 1 brand new starter so far anyone have a suggestion?
 

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welcome to the forums. what and where did you buy the starter solenoid ?, Honda oem ?, or china after market from ebay ?. posb starter button is corroded on the switch housing ?.
 

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thanks for the welcome. It is an after market soleniod but purchased at the dealer. Would a bad starter button let juice keep flowing when the key is off?
no, when the key is off, no power should be reaching the starter at all. now, if the key is on ?, and the starter button was sticking ?, then this would allow the starter to keep spinning. even if you purchased it at the dealer ?, this does not make it oem unless it said '' Honda '' or '' made in japan '' on the package ?.
 

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If you continue to see 12 volts at the starter after turning the key off, then it would seem that the problem is one of these:

1. The starter and/or starter relay are wired wrong.

2. The starter relay is sticking so as to continue to feed power to the starter even though there is no power to the starter relay coil.
 

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is the relay in the fuse box or one of the 2 narrow plastic cylindrical shaped things in the battery compartment(they look like electrical connectors with a wire at each end).
The relay is the same thing that you referred to as the solenoid. I call it the starter relay because that is how Honda refers to it. It is the device that has the two large wires connected to it that go to the battery positive terminal and the starter. If you want to conduct a very simple test that will determine with 100% accuracy whether or not it is working correctly, let me know and I'll give you step by step instructions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
understood, i have only known this as the solenoid. I really appreciate your time and patience. this is the second new starter, as i said, the first one burned up when this ugly problem reared its head. what really throws me is how the starter feed stays live when everything is off. I think my first option is to buy and install a Honda OEM solenoid, and Do you agree? thanks so much
 

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understood, i have only known this as the solenoid. I really appreciate your time and patience. this is the second new starter, as i said, the first one burned up when this ugly problem reared its head. what really throws me is how the starter feed stays live when everything is off. I think my first option is to buy and install a Honda OEM solenoid, and Do you agree? thanks so much
I agree with the oem starter solenoid, but please read/look at my pic showing how to wire your starter solenoid up to your battery and starter ! :). oh, and your welcome.
 

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Fantini, I agree that you don't want to continue burning up starters. Replacing the starter relay with a Honda OEM unit may be your answer, but let's do this simple test first which will give you an answer with no guesswork. This test will determine whether your problem lies with your wiring, or with the starter relay itself.

Before starting the test, remove the large starter wire from the starter relay. This will keep the starter motor from running during the test. Leave the battery wire on the relay as normal.

1. Attach your volt meter to the starter wire terminal on the starter relay (the terminal that you just removed the starter wire from).

2. Turn the key on and push the start button. You should read 12 volts on your meter.

3. Now release the start button and turn the key off. According to your original post, I expect that you will still read 12 volts now (even though a healthy system would read 0 volts).

4. Keep the volt meter in place and open the connector for the two small wires on your starter relay. When you open this connector, if the volt meter goes to zero, then the problem is with the wiring in your machine and further testing will be required to find the problem. If the volt meter continues to read 12 volts after opening the connector, then the problem is due to internal sticking of the starter relay, and the starter relay will need to be replaced.

You might have to repeat this test a few times to get a reliable answer, because if the problem is due to internal sticking of the starter relay, it may not stick every time.

-Ken
 

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Ken, that's the ticket. It is definitely the relay. I'll be at my local Honda dealer when they open tomorrow. no more $18 Ebay solenoids. thank you sir
Lou
Glad you found the problem. Conducting simple tests like you did go a long way to pinpoint the source of a issue. The test results give you confidence that buying a new part will fix the problem instead of just throwing money at it hoping it goes away.
 
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