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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I have an opportunity. 2000 King Quad 300 4x4 with 1200 miles for $1500. Has the super low sub transmission. Appears to be in nice shape. I know it's not Honda but a lot of you know your ATV's. Your thoughts?
 

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Those bikes were way before their time. Hi/low/super low transmissions, selectable 4wd WITH A DIFF LOCK, disc brakes all around......

BUT (and there's always a BUT isn't there?) they are hard as hell to work on, and the parts are absolutely ridiculous.

My father in law has two Arctic Cat 300's, which were pretty much rebadged King Quads. I had to replace the starter gears in his engine and it was the worst experience I've had working on an ATV. HORRIBLY difficult to take apart and reassemble.

Couple that with the price of parts, and I wouldn't get one unless it was super cheap, and then it would be a "bash it till it dies and scrap it" toy that I wouldn't plan on working on.

His carb leaked, filled up the crankcase with gas, which is very common on these models. Replacement carbs are north of $400. A replacement needle for the bowl was $40+, and didn't fix the problem. The carb runs downhill into the engine so if the float sticks, it will fill up with gas EVERY TIME.

Replacing the starter gears required removing the left crankcase cover, which required unbolting the engine and almost splitting the bike in half to get the cover off and back on.

So, while they are bikes that have a lot of neat stuff on them, they are not something you want to work on.

My .02
 

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I agree with Jeep. ^^^^ I did some carb work (and other little maintenance stuffs to get one running) on one and thought it was a pretty cool bike at first... until the owner asked me "where is the dipstick? I haven't ever been able to check the oil and I can't figure out how to change it!" This was a 2001 model mind you... and that conversation took place 3 years ago at a neighboring deer camp. What a rotten pile of garbage that over-under-engineered bike turned out to be! Thankfully the guys' girlfriend left him the following month and took his bike with her (she sold it on CL for xmas money), in a spiteful fit of anger, else he'd probably have toted it out back behind his camp and shot it!

If you're seriously thinking about buying that bike, my best advice is: Stay really busy doing something else until that urge passes.
 

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Don't overlook if it's decent. I have a 2002 KQ 300, alongside my 3 Honda's. It's the workhorse of the crew with super low, diff lock. Tough to lose traction with that. Really solid bike that I've enjoyed for 9 years and likely will forever. Heavy boat dock in/out, drag gravel road, push snow, move a trailer, winch some stuff, whatever.

Front Discs, rear drum, easy to get parts on Partzilla and locally, cost no more than Honda and all other Japanese OEM products. Super easy to repair and maintain if you know where things are at. Carb is straight forward like a Honda 300. No dipstick, site glass with high/low markers.

Not a horsepower or trail ride king, but a king of traction that digs in, works hard and won't let you down.
 
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Don't overlook if it's decent. I have a 2002 KQ 300, alongside my 3 Honda's. It's the workhorse of the crew with super low, diff lock. Tough to lose traction with that. Really solid bike that I've enjoyed for 9 years and likely will forever. Heavy boat dock in/out, drag gravel road, push snow, move a trailer, winch some stuff, whatever.

Front Discs, rear drum, easy to get parts on Partzilla and locally, cost no more than Honda and all other Japanese OEM products. Super easy to repair and maintain if you know where things are at. Carb is straight forward like a Honda 300. No dipstick, site glass with high/low markers.

Not a horsepower or trail ride king, but a king of traction that digs in, works hard and won't let you down.
The 2000 Arctic Cat 300's my father in law has (which again, are basically rebadged KQ's) actually have a rear disc brake, which shocked me. The AC 300's do NOT have the diff lock, but it's there in the front diff, just doesn't have the right cable to fully actuate it. You have to do a few cable mods to get the diff lock to work.

And yeah, site glass in lieu of a dipstick.

I will disagree on parts prices though. They seem super high to me vs Honda parts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Man I'm torn. On one hand it seems like a cool machine. On the other hand if it's a nightmare to work on i don't want that either. I'm looking to add a second quad to the stable. I've looked at new Rancher 2wd's that can be had for around 5 grand. Not sure I want to spend that much. Used machines that are decent seem to be around $3500. Maybe I'll wait until something else comes along.
 

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Hey, if the KQ 300 looks well maintained and the price is fair, its probably no worse than putting up with any new Honda Rancher! The newer bikes are all electronic-ally controlled (& locked down/designed so the average owner can't fix them) which in my opinion as a mechanic, they are all useless toads. I won't ever own one of those and I hate working on them. They're unreliable junk that are designed to empty your wallet periodically. I'd rather deal with a mechanical nightmare than an electric one, out on the trail (or in the shop).
 

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Hey, if the KQ 300 looks well maintained and the price is fair, its probably no worse than putting up with any new Honda Rancher! The newer bikes are all electronic-ally controlled (& locked down/designed so the average owner can't fix them) which in my opinion as a mechanic, they are all useless toads. I won't ever own one of those and I hate working on them. They're unreliable junk that are designed to empty your wallet periodically. I'd rather deal with a mechanical nightmare than an electric one, out on the trail (or in the shop).
am I understanding this comment right ^^^^ ?, you do own a trx350 rancher that is electronic shift, as well as all that useless stuff you claim here ^^^, and yet...you own one, and speak highly of it, did I miss something here ???..lol.
 

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you do own a trx350 rancher that is electronic shift, as well as all that useless stuff you claim here
Define "all that useless stuff"... Yes, I own a 2000 Rancher ES. Which cannot be compared electrically to any 2012 & up Honda. I don't get what you don't understand... the old Rancher is carbureted, it has a CDI, electric cooling fan, starter motor, shift motor, ECM and a regulator/rectifier. The only sensor on the bike is the oil temp sensor, and those have been in use since the 80s on most Honda ATVs. It is a pretty minimalist bike in my opinion, similar to all others produced in that era. I can hold the wiring harnesses in one hand! :)

EDIT: Correction, it has a speed sensor too, so make that two sensors. None of those prevent the bike from running though... it'll carry my butt home no matter what happens to it, for as long as the spark plug sparks.
 

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The point I was trying to make is the fact that Honda ATVs are not manufactured to be simple, durable and reliable anymore. They are all electronic trick bags nowadays... made chintzy on purpose, designed so folks cannot work on them... certainly cannot fix them before taking out a 2nd mortgage on 'da shack, and when they fail (which is quite often!) the owner must walk home or beg a friend for towing. May as well own a china Kymco and budget for a good pair of walking boots, cause spending more $$$ for a new Honda, while expecting durable and reliable...? That's a fools game in my opinion.
 

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The point I was trying to make is the fact that Honda ATVs are not manufactured to be simple, durable and reliable anymore. They are all electronic trick bags nowadays... made chintzy on purpose, designed so folks cannot work on them... certainly cannot fix them before taking out a 2nd mortgage on 'da shack, and when they fail (which is quite often!) the owner must walk home or beg a friend for towing. May as well own a china Kymco and budget for a good pair of walking boots, cause spending more $$$ for a new Honda, while expecting durable and reliable...? That's a fools game in my opinion.
can't argue that ^^^..lol.
 
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Back when folks had some common sense we all bought machines that required compression, fuel and spark to run. Very few ever had to walk home.

Nowadays folks buy machines that require compression, fuel and spark to run, along with a gazillion inter-dependent electronic sensors, pumps, multiple computers (each designed by default to shut the machine down at every opportunity, while flipping you upside down until your wallet empties out and the family goes hungry, rather than simply carry ya dignified butts back home!), each with wiring harnesses weighing up to 1/20th of the total machine mass! All of those are required for the motor to run so many must walk home nowadays, despite the fact that there is compression... and there'd be reliable fuel and spark too, if not for all of the electronic traps purposely designed in to the chintzy china-like machines to prevent fuel and spark from happening.

Thats human progress, ehh? :-(
 

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That's why I refuse to swap my Jeeps to EFI. I did get rid of the computer (80's computer at that) controlled Carter BBD carbs and swapped old Ford MC2100 2 barrels onto them. They run well, and are super easy to keep running.

Is EFI nice? Yep. Is it as easy to keep running as those MC's? Not by a long shot.
 
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