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Discussion Starter #1
So I have a 1989 350d foreman. Smokes a little just at idle but during normal driving it's like a smoke screen. The smoke just looks white to me but there is spots of what looks like oil on my hitch. I did a compression test and that came back a around 105-115psi.
Any help would be greatly appreciated
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yea I let the 4 wheeler warm up to operating temp. Shut it off. Pulled the plug. Held throttle wide open and cranked the motor over till the gauge stopped going up. How hard is it to replace the rings. Anything else I should replace while i have it apart.
Thanks guys
 

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If your going to remove the top end you'd usually change everything accessible, piston, rings, little end bearing cam chain gear and cam chain.
All depends how far you want to go and how deep your pockets are :)
 

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On a scale 1-10 it would be a 10. It's the biggest job requires time, special tools, processes and experience.
Not saying you couldn't or shouldn't do it yourself; go through the manual and check your comfort level. You'll probably find you want to do some not all
 

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@jjresop,

Depending on your location, there may be a forum member nearby that would be willing to help you with anything that you find yourself uncomfortable doing. A few well qualified members here have offered to help out other members... they'll do the entire job for you if you wish. Thought I'd mention that option just in case...

In any case, I hope that you are able to fix that bike up and put it back to work. Its a fine, durable, hard working and uncomplicated machine. Can't buy anything that can match it nowadays.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Ok so I'm located in Wisconsin. I'm thinking about going with that G&H service. Sounds like a pretty good company and a good deal. Anyone else gone through them? What's the best/ easiest way to remove the top end? Whole motor out or would I have enough room to just remove the top end.
Thanks for all the help so far. Very appreciated
 

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Quite a few members here have used G&H. They know their stuff and do excellent machine work. They offer and use only the highest quality brand name piston kits available. They remind me of the old-school craftsmen machinists that are almost all dead and gone nowadays. They take no shortcuts... You'd be hard-pressed to find anyone more skilled and capable than they are. Call them up and talk to them, they are very helpful folks.

You can do the topend and timing chain job while the motor is still mounted in the frame or you can take the motor off and work off the bench. Do it the way you are most comfortable doing. I personally prefer to do the work off the bench cause I'm an old fart with a bad back, junk hands and failing eyesight. In my early days I'd always bulldog it... nowadays I can't. Its your call....

You'll need the FSM and common metric tools to get the right side cover off & the topend apart, and a decent impact gun (air or electric) with sockets to get the clutches off, so you can remove the oil pump to swap the camshaft chain out.

Precautionary tip for ya:
I've done a lot of topends over the years and every now and then while I'm lifting the cylinder off from the cases on a worn out or busted up motor, I've had broken piston ring chunks or other junk fall out as soon as I lifted the jug up clear of the rings and the loose piston falls over.

Before lifting the cylinder jug from the crankcase, rotate the crankshaft so that the piston is at the top of the bore (TDC). Get a handful of clean rags or towels ready and begin to slowly lift the jug until the piston skirt is seen clearing the bottom of the jug. Hold the cylinder right there, don't lift it any further... and stuff your clean rags in real good and tight all the way around the connecting rod at the top of the crankcase, so that if any busted piston ring chunks, loose wrist pin circlip, busted piston ring lands or whatever... can't fall into the crankcase while taking it apart and while you are working on it... and ruin your entire day! Leave your rags in there until you are sliding the jug back down on reassembly with all new parts.

I've only seen it happen to someone (not me!) once... don't forget to remove those rags altogether before you drop the jug back on. :)

EDIT:
One of the clutches have lefthanded threads and the other clutch has righthanded threads on the nuts holding them on. Both are staked down from the factory. You can use an Impact gun and zip them both off without unstaking them first, no problem. Just don't try to take the lefthanded threaded nut off, thinking its a righthanded nut... & vice-versa... :)

Another very important tip, this one is critical to your success!
When you get your cylinder back from the machinist, Scrub it thoroughly inside & out with HOT, SOAPY WATER and stiff plastic scrub brushes. The freshly honed bore (if unwashed) is full of machining grit and honing oil. If all that junk is not scrubbed out of the bore it will chew up your new piston rings in just a few seconds on first startup and will ruin the fresh new bore. I can't state this any firmer... Scrub it until you are sure you have it laboratory clean... then grab a second batch of hot, soapy water and scrub it again! Finally, rinse the soap out of it and wipe it out immediately using rubbing alcohol to remove the water quickly. Then put a bit of CLEAN motor oil on a WHITE paper towel or cotton rag and wipe the bore with oil real good. Look at your wipe when finished... is it stained at all? If your white wipe isn't still perfectly white, mix up another batch of hot soapy water and scrub it again. Make sure you oil the bore immediately following the alcohol wash to prevent it from beginning to form rust.

No worries, its not difficult work... just thoughtful and thorough work... Have fun with it!
 

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My hands are so shot that I can't control my fingers very well. I still feel like I'm capable and I still work with my hands the same as I have my entire life though. Old working habits are very hard to break... particularly when it comes down to whether my palms & fingers have a good grip on my tools and parts I'm holding, or not! I'm used to doing complicated multitasking type maneuvers with my hands and fingers, commonly doing two or three things with my hands at once. I can't get rid of those working habits and nowadays its costing me big time...

All during my younger days I had very talented hands... so much so that other mechanics in the various shops where I worked learned to come and get me to bail them out whenever they got into a tough spot in their work. More often nowadays I can't get anywhere near being that smart with them. I drop stuff constantly. I drop tools, I drop screws nuts & bolts, I drop small parts, I drop large parts too. I subconsciously flip my fingers all around multitasking like nothing has changed and I can't tame down those old habits no matter how hard I try.

Nowadays I gotta work off the bench and be constantly thinking about my hands. I have to work very slow and think my way through all the routine stuff cause if I don't, I'll immediately drop something expensive and ruin it.

Don't be like me... don't try to do too much at once with an arrogant expectation that you'll always get away with it... and you'll be fine.

Keep us updated on your topend rebuild if you can...
 

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Digital camera, sharpie, ziplock bags..

We're here if you need us. I've used G&H on 2 top ends and wouldn't consider doing it any other way. Mail them your cylinder (and head if you wish) they send it back bored, new piston, rings gaskets ready to go..


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